Media Coverage


Orchids join endangered species list

Orchids join endangered species list

A new study has suggested that because of illegal trading, Paphiopedilum callosumis, one of several species of slipper orchids, has been classified as endangered. The illegal trading of exquisite orchids at plant markets in Thailand is “invisible” because hardly any of it makes it into government statistics that are supposed to document illegal trade in wild flora, noted Jacob Phelps and Edward Webb of the Center for International Forestry Research, Science News reported.


Beauty drives orchids towards extinction

Beauty drives orchids towards extinction

At plant markets in Thailand, exquisite orchids are for sale. This trade is “invisible” because hardly any of it makes it into government statistics that are supposed to document illegal trade in wild flora, Jacob Phelps and Edward Webb of the Center for International Forestry Research in Bogor Borat, Indonesia, note this month in Biological Conservation.


Why love of landscapes is central to climate challenge

Why love of landscapes is central to climate challenge

With land degradation soaring, climate strategists are looking beyond piecemeal projects to raise cash for conservation. These efforts need millions of dollars to grow, more money than governments or civil society can provide, which is where supporters of the landscapes concept hope it will be a catalyst. Peter Holmgren, director general of the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) argues it “resonates” with the finance community, offering the potential for investments on scale.

 


The rise of the ‘landscapes’ agenda

The rise of the ‘landscapes’ agenda

International development is rife with buzzwords. New concepts spring to the fore — many of them refashioned or remarketed versions of old concepts. They flood panel discussions, procurement orders and program design documents — that is, until the next “big thing” emerges to take their place. “By bridging these boundaries and opening up the conversation you will also find new solutions that you wouldn’t find in the separate, more isolated situation,” Peter Holmgren, director general of the Center for International Forestry Research, told Devex. CIFOR, which has convened the first two editions of the Global Landscapes Forum, sees the platform as an opportunity to find common ground that establishes a cohesive community of participants from environment, development and finance backgrounds.


Amazonian biodiversity protects health, livelihoods

Amazonian biodiversity protects health, livelihoods

Like countless generations of Amazonian people relies on a combination of food crops and forest products. This diversity—both natural and agricultural—provides a varied diet and an assortment of goods ranging from natural dyes and medicines to palm fronds for roof thatch. Besides being the main source of protein for villagers in the Amazon region, fish and wild animals provide important micronutrients such as calcium, iron and Vitamin C, according to a study led by Nathalie van Vliet of the Center for International Forestry Research.


Pemantauan Hutan Tiap Tahun

Pemantauan Hutan Tiap Tahun

Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup dan Kehutanan mulai menyusun laporan pemantauan hutan setiap tahun. Sebelumnya, pemantauan dilakukan setiap tiga tahun. Hal itu membuat pemerintah tergagap menyikapi dinamika perkembangan kehutanan dan selalu berargumen dalam menjawab pertanyaan soal tutupan hutan. “Pernah CIFOR (lembaga kehutanan internasional) mengeluarkan data kebakaran seluas 140.000 hektar (analisis citra satelit). Namun, menurut pemerintah daerah hanya 24.000 hektar (manual),” kata Untung Suprapto (perwakilan dari Direktur Pengendalian Kebakaran Hutan Kementerian LHK).

 

 


Science could spur growth in sustainable industry

Science could spur growth in sustainable industry

Private investors are interested in financing sustainable land use projects and scientists could provide the evidence to help them do so, a meeting heard last week. Peter Holmgren, director-general of the non-profit Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), said companies can help protect landscapes by financing long-term projects. He added that firms have an interest in sustainable production to ensure security of supply and gain their customers’ approval.


What do China, Kenya and India have in common? Wildlife trafficking

What do China, Kenya and India have in common? Wildlife trafficking

When it comes to trafficking rhino, elephant, and tiger parts the biggest players are China, Kenya, India, Vietnam, South Africa and Thailand, according to a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).  Jacob Phelps with the Center for International Forestry Research criticized the study for focusing on charismatic animals that already reap most of the media attention and conservation efforts devoted to wildlife trafficking. “Tigers, rhinos and elephants are by no means the most widely traded of taxa. It’s things like seahorses, plants, pangolins, ornamental birds, corals for fish tanks, endangered fish for restaurants–these are the things that represent the bulk of illegal wildlife trade,” he told Wired. “We see a lot more reporting on tigers rather than turtle eggs or softshell turtles being served at a restaurant. We need to be aware that bias carries through.”



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