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Indonesia’s mangroves can help slow climate change

Indonesia’s mangroves can help slow climate change

Conservation of Indonesia’s mangrove forests should be considered as a major strategy for global climate change mitigation, a new research says. Daniel Murdiyarso and his team measured carbon stocks of 39 mangrove sites across Indonesia. Based on their calculation, mangrove deforestation in Indonesia alone contributed to 42 per cent of the world’s carbon emissions.


Mangrove Bisa Kurangi Emisi Gas Rumah Kaca

Mangrove Bisa Kurangi Emisi Gas Rumah Kaca

Indonesia merupakan negara dengan wilayah mangrove terluas di dunia. Jumlahnya lebih dari 2,9 juta hektare. “Deforestasi mangrove juga cepat, 52 ribu hektare per tahun. Hilangnya mangrove bisa menyumbang 20% emisi akibat penggunaan lahan di Indonesia. Dengan melindungi mangrove, Indonesia bisa mencapai seperempat dari 26% target nasional reduksi emisi gas rumah kaca pada 2020. Kami berharap angka ini membantu para pengambil keputusan untuk memandang pentingnya keberlanjutan mangrove sebagai solusi potensial perubahan iklim,” ujar Peneliti Utama CIFOR Daniel Murdiyarso, kemarin.


A recipe for sustainability

A recipe for sustainability

Palm-oil firms are trying to go green. Governments could do more to help. Indonesia says it wants to cut its carbon-dioxide emissions by more than a quarter by 2020; since 2011 it has trumpeted a patchily-enforced ban on tree-felling in its thickest jungles. But the government is “nervous” about the newfound conservationism among big palm-oil firms, reckons Krystof Obidzinski of CIFOR, a forestry think-tank.


Less chance of Indonesian forest fire haze this year – officials

Less chance of Indonesian forest fire haze this year – officials

Indonesian leaders say there is less chance of haze from forest fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan affecting the region this year. Cutting and burning forest to open land for agriculture was considered the primary cause. A 2003 study from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) estimated that economic losses from haze affecting transportation in the region amounted to $1.62 to $2.7 billion in 1997-98, and losses from other smoke pollution were between $674 million and $799 million.


Mangroves can play big role in tackling climate change

Mangroves can play big role in tackling climate change

Indonesia’s mangroves store large amounts of carbon, and saving them could help the country reduce greenhouse gas emissions, a new research paper has found.   The mangroves store about 3.14 billion tonnes of carbon, equivalent to about one-third of the carbon stored in the world’s coastal ecosystems, according to the paper co-authored by scientists at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).“We hope that these numbers help policymakers see mangroves as a huge opportunity for climate change mitigation,” says Mr Daniel Murdiyarso, principal scientist at CIFOR and lead author of the paper.


African river study fills gap in carbon emissions tally

African river study fills gap in carbon emissions tally

African rivers emit a vast amount of greenhouse gases, a major paper on this understudied topic reveals. Christopher Martius, a scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research in Indonesia, says the contribution of African rivers to greenhouse gas emissions had previously been overlooked and commends the researchers for gathering a large dataset.


Stopping mangrove deforestation in Indonesia could help slow climate change

Stopping mangrove deforestation in Indonesia could help slow climate change

Preventing the loss of Indonesian mangroves would help in the global fight against climate change, new research shows. According to Professor Murdiyarso, deforestation of Indonesian mangroves contributes to almost half of the global carbon emissions from the destruction of coastal ecosystems, which including marshes, mangroves and sea grasses. Every year, Indonesia loses around 52,000 hectares of mangroves.


Mangrove protection ‘essential for slowing climate change’

Mangrove protection ‘essential for slowing climate change’

Mangrove deforestation in Indonesia emits 190 million tonnes of CO2-eq annually, which accounts for 42% of the world’s annual emissions from the destruction of coastal ecosystem services (that is, marshes, mangroves and sea grasses). That’s the same amount of emissions as if every car in Indonesia drove around the world twice. “We hope that these numbers help policymakers see mangroves as a huge opportunity for climate change mitigation,” says Daniel Murdiyarso, Principal Scientist at CIFOR and lead author of the paper.



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