Media Coverage


Armed with smartphones, Cameroon forest defenders take on illegal loggers

Armed with smartphones, Cameroon forest defenders take on illegal loggers

The presence of many timber firms, combined with a failure to apply forestry laws, has fuelled a surge in illegal activities, experts say. Training volunteers is seen as a good step, but much more needs to be done to curb illegal deforestation. Richard Eba’a Atyi, a scientist of CIFOR said that  the government needs to streamline its forest governance reforms by putting an end to impunity , an international forest research organisation.


CIFOR: Hutan bakau penting bagi manusia

CIFOR: Hutan bakau penting bagi manusia

Pada acara Seminar Lingkungan Hidup di Pusat Kebudayaan Italia Jakarta, Kamis (2/2), Ilmuwan senior dari Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Profesor Daniel Mudiyarso, mengatakan bahwa hutan bakau atau mangrove penting untuk dilestarikan karena memberikan banyak manfaat, meliputi hutan bakau dapat menjadi sumber makanan, air bersih, kayu, serat serta bahan bakar bagi makhluk hidup lainnya. Dalam seminar itu, ia mengatakan bahwa hutan bakau juga dapat menjadi sumber energi, menjaga perubahan cuaca, kemungkinan bencana alam dan juga pembersihan air.

This article is also published on Skanaa and Republika Online under title Ini Pentingnya Mangrove Bagi Manusia, Bisnis.com under title Ternyata Mangrove Penting Bagi Manusia. Ini Penjelasannya,


Indonesian groups among world’s influential think tanks: Report

Indonesian groups among world’s influential think tanks: Report

Prominent Indonesian organizations have been listed among the world’s most influential think tanks in 2016 according to a study by the Lauder Institute of the University of Pennsylvania. The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) was the world’s 25thmost influential think tank on environment policy.

 

This article is also published on Liputan6.com under title Geliat LSM Indonesia di Mata Dunia


Community involvement in mangrove management makes them sustainable: Study

Community involvement in mangrove management makes them sustainable: Study

Mangrove forests that incorporate local communities into their management fare better, finds a new global study, recognizing that gender and community rights in mangrove use and planning prevent the deterioration of these fragile ecosystems. The study, administered by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), was released on Thursday marking the World Wetlands Day. Scientists conducted a review of international literature as well as case studies in Indonesia and Tanzania to draw the conclusions for the study on mangrove governance. The study has a greater implications on the management of the Sunderbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest, local scientists say. According to the study, mangrove forests are overwhelmingly managed by government institutions that often fall under the jurisdiction of multiple ministries, creating a maze of vague responsibilities that deliver little protection on the ground.


Governments ill-equipped to protect mangroves, need to involve communities – global study

Governments ill-equipped to protect mangroves, need to involve communities – global study

The majority of the world’s mangroves are managed by government agencies that are too poorly equipped to protect them, according to a global review of the forests known for their effectiveness in absorbing carbon. Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) stated that Four of the five countries with the largest mangrove areas are middle income nations – Indonesia, Brazil, Mexico and Nigeria – which lack the capacity to protect their millions of hectares of mangrove forest. Mangroves’ management often falls under the jurisdiction of multiple ministries, from forestry to fisheries, creating a maze of vague responsibilities that deliver little protection on the ground. Global attention on mangroves has grown due to their effectiveness in absorbing atmospheric carbon, one of the main drivers of climate change, as well as sheltering fisheries and protecting against coastal erosion. CIFOR said that compounding the mangrove management problem is a lack of clear or documented rights and incentives for the communities living in the forests to use them sustainably.

This article is also published under the same title on Mail on Sunday, Daily Mail Online, Voice of America, Paris Guardian, etc


Riset: Hutan Tersisa Sumatera Itu, Jalur Jelajah Mamalia Besar

Riset: Hutan Tersisa Sumatera Itu, Jalur Jelajah Mamalia Besar

Di tengah luasnya Pulau Sumatera, yang wilayahnya digunakan industri perkebunan kayu, ternyata hutan aslinya yang tersisa dapat berfungsi sebagai koridor mamalia besar. Sebuah riset yang dipublikasikan bulan lalu di Tropical Conservation Science menunjukkan, mempertahankan jaringan hutan riparian – habitat yang mencakup tepi sungai dan sungai – dapat menjadikan kawasan perkebunan industri untuk pulp dan kertas sebagai wilayah yang ramah satwa liar. Robert Nasi, ilmuwan CIFOR mengatakan bahwa penelitian tersebut menunjukkan bahwa dengan beberapa syarat, kita dapat mempertahankan konektivitas di seluruh lansekap produktif, yang penting untuk banyak proses ekologi

 


Politician’s son named a suspect over illegal land clearing in Leuser Ecosystem

Politician’s son named a suspect over illegal land clearing in Leuser Ecosystem

Teuku Popon Rizal, the son of a local parliament chief has been named a suspect over illegal land clearing in the Singkil Swamp Wildlife Reserve, a heavily protected area home to the densest population of Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii). The case is the just the latest example of encroachment in Indonesia’s protected areas. The blame tends to fall on impoverished villagers, but the revelation of Rizal’s involvement highlights the role often played by more powerful actors. A recent study by the Center for International Forestry Research, described how members of political parties and local elites organize farmers to slash-and-burn land in Riau province, not far from Aceh, before selling the land to a variety of large and small buyers. The practice is illegal in most cases.


Study finds that carbon finance is not a one-size-fits-all solution to deforestation

Study finds that carbon finance is not a one-size-fits-all solution to deforestation

Halting the pace at which we’re destroying the world’s forests for agriculture, forestry, mines, and other economic development projects is crucial to combating climate change. Carbon finance, which involves creating monetary incentives for companies and countries to invest in programs to reduce carbon emissions, is one potential solution being employed today. A study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters earlier this month found that, while carbon finance can be effective in the right circumstances, it is not a one-size-fits-all solution. Ashwin Ravikumar, an environmental social scientist at The Field Museum in Chicago and the study’s lead author, led a team that included researchers with the Department of Forest Services in Finland and the Center for International Forestry Research in Peru that looked at the potential of eight landscapes in four countries around the world to generate carbon revenues.

This article is also published in Eco-Business.com and Myinforms under the same title



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