Media Coverage


Cameroon: Congo Basin – Innovative Forest Management Approaches

Cameroon: Congo Basin – Innovative Forest Management Approaches

Bioversity International in collaboration with CIFOR, IRAD, IRET and UNIKIS in Cameroon, Gabon and the Democratic Republic of Congo presented findings of the 40-month research project executed in the Congo Basin. The research found out that people living in or around the forest collect caterpillars, oils, fruits, medicines, and trees for construction directly from the concessions. The potential conflicts of the people living in the forest and the concessions are high because the concessions have the legal rights to use the forest.


Planet Earth is actually getting greener — but that might not be a good thing

Planet Earth is actually getting greener — but that might not be a good thing

In a recently published study, scientists found that despite ongoing deforestation, the world actually added vegetation between 2003 and 2013. Two of the biggest reasons were massive reforestation programs in China and the regrowth in parts of the former Soviet Union. But Verchot, Louis Verchot, a researcher at the Center for International Forestry Research says Savannas and shrublands, type of vegetation in the north actually worsens climate change.


Tackling unsustainable hunting

Tackling unsustainable hunting

Over-harvesting of bushmeat means that current practices are increasingly unsustainable, but banning such practices could lead to increased deforestation. The Centre for International Forestry Research warns, however, that to replace bushmeat protein with beef would result in up to 25 million ha of forest having to be cleared for pasture. It also suggests that a ban on the hunting of vulnerable species, such as gorillas, while being difficult to enforce, could still be more effective than a total ban. This would allow hunting of resilient species such as duikers and porcupines to continue.


Buenas iniciativas para reducir emisiones de carbono

Buenas iniciativas para reducir emisiones de carbono

Creado en septiembre de 2008 por la ONU y el gobierno de Noruega, el Programa de Reducción de Emisiones de Carbono causadas por la Deforestación y la Degradación de los Bosques (REDD por sus siglas en inglés), tiene un objetivo claro: crear incentivos económicos para ayudar a reducir las emisiones de carbono.   Desde su fundación, REDD ha visto nacer más de 300 proyectos alrededor del mundo. A finales de 2014, el Centro para la Investigación Forestal Internacional (CIFOR) publicó un informe con 22 de las iniciativas de REDD más exitosas, entre ellas seis de Brasil y dos de Perú.


On the World’s Forests and Climate Change

On the World’s Forests and Climate Change

Nearly 4 billion tons of carbon have been added to plants above ground since 2003. Most of the growth has resulted from tree-planting programs in China, forest regrowth in former Soviet states and high rainfall in African, Australian and South American savannas. At the same time, there has been large-scale deforestation in Brazil and Indonesia.

Louis Verchot, a research director at the Indonesia-based Center for International Forestry Research, said, “As ice and permafrost melt, they are being replaced by vegetation, and the tree line is moving north as the Arctic warms”. Vegetation growth is also expected to increase due to rising CO2 in the atmosphere, known as the “CO2 fertilization effect”.


Cameroon fishing industry and tourism battered by extreme weather

Cameroon fishing industry and tourism battered by extreme weather

Most of the forests in Cameroon’s south have been sacrificed for development projects, they say, including huge tracts of land around Kribi that have been cleared for the new port and gas plant. Experts say mangrove forests along the coast are crucial to protecting the shoreline and mitigating damage from storms and high seas. “Even if we negate all benefits of mangroves as forests, their value as the ‘shoreline protector’ should be enough to convince us to conserve them,” says Youssoufa Bele, one of the authors of a 2014 report about the importance of mangroves by the Centre for International Forestry Research.


Scientists say world getting greener despite drought

Scientists say world getting greener despite drought

Scientists analysed 20 years of satellite data and found the increase in carbon, despite ongoing large-scale tropical deforestation in Brazil and Indonesia, according to research published on Monday in Nature Climate Change. Louis Verchot, a research director at the Indonesia-based Centre for International Forestry Research, said Yi Liu’s findings were “by and large what we would expect in the warmer and wetter world that results from climate change”.


In Indonesia, local communities lose out as oil palm expands

In Indonesia, local communities lose out as oil palm expands

Oil palm, billed as a way to improve local economic opportunity and reduce poverty in the tropics, may not live up to that billing, a recent report shows. In fact, a case study from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) on the effects of oil palm on economy, ecology and society in West Papua paints a stark picture.



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