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Riset: Hutan Tersisa Sumatera Itu, Jalur Jelajah Mamalia Besar

Riset: Hutan Tersisa Sumatera Itu, Jalur Jelajah Mamalia Besar

Di tengah luasnya Pulau Sumatera, yang wilayahnya digunakan industri perkebunan kayu, ternyata hutan aslinya yang tersisa dapat berfungsi sebagai koridor mamalia besar. Sebuah riset yang dipublikasikan bulan lalu di Tropical Conservation Science menunjukkan, mempertahankan jaringan hutan riparian – habitat yang mencakup tepi sungai dan sungai – dapat menjadikan kawasan perkebunan industri untuk pulp dan kertas sebagai wilayah yang ramah satwa liar. Robert Nasi, ilmuwan CIFOR mengatakan bahwa penelitian tersebut menunjukkan bahwa dengan beberapa syarat, kita dapat mempertahankan konektivitas di seluruh lansekap produktif, yang penting untuk banyak proses ekologi

 


Politician’s son named a suspect over illegal land clearing in Leuser Ecosystem

Politician’s son named a suspect over illegal land clearing in Leuser Ecosystem

Teuku Popon Rizal, the son of a local parliament chief has been named a suspect over illegal land clearing in the Singkil Swamp Wildlife Reserve, a heavily protected area home to the densest population of Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii). The case is the just the latest example of encroachment in Indonesia’s protected areas. The blame tends to fall on impoverished villagers, but the revelation of Rizal’s involvement highlights the role often played by more powerful actors. A recent study by the Center for International Forestry Research, described how members of political parties and local elites organize farmers to slash-and-burn land in Riau province, not far from Aceh, before selling the land to a variety of large and small buyers. The practice is illegal in most cases.


Study finds that carbon finance is not a one-size-fits-all solution to deforestation

Study finds that carbon finance is not a one-size-fits-all solution to deforestation

Halting the pace at which we’re destroying the world’s forests for agriculture, forestry, mines, and other economic development projects is crucial to combating climate change. Carbon finance, which involves creating monetary incentives for companies and countries to invest in programs to reduce carbon emissions, is one potential solution being employed today. A study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters earlier this month found that, while carbon finance can be effective in the right circumstances, it is not a one-size-fits-all solution. Ashwin Ravikumar, an environmental social scientist at The Field Museum in Chicago and the study’s lead author, led a team that included researchers with the Department of Forest Services in Finland and the Center for International Forestry Research in Peru that looked at the potential of eight landscapes in four countries around the world to generate carbon revenues.

This article is also published in Eco-Business.com and Myinforms under the same title


How Local Elites Earn Money From Burning Land in Indonesia

How Local Elites Earn Money From Burning Land in Indonesia

A “fire economy” has emerged in Indonesia in which the blazes tearing through the country’s land and forests, driven largely by the global demand for palm oil, are lining the pockets of local elites and their patronage networks, according to a new study. The study — carried out by scientists from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), the University of Riau and Bogor Agricultural University — focuses on four districts in Riau province, on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra. The province reportedly experiences the most frequent fires in Indonesia, due largely to the massive conversion of forests and peatlands to oil palm estates, where slash-and-burn methods are employed to clear land for planting. The practice is illegal in almost all cases.

This article is also published in Eco-Business.com, MyinformsVastuullisuusuutiset.fi under the same title


Plantations main drivers of deforestation in Sabah, Sarawak

Plantations main drivers of deforestation in Sabah, Sarawak

Plantation industries have been the principal driver of deforestation in Sabah and Sarawak over the last four decades, says a non-profit global research group. Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) said the two states had 15 million hectares of old-growth forest in 1973 (which accounted for 76% of their total land mass), but they lost 4.2 million hectares (28%) of forest between then and 2015. David Gaveau, a scientist from CIFOR said that plantation industries have been the principle driver of deforestation in Malaysian Borneo over the last four decades.


Indonesia aims to bury slash-and-burn

Indonesia aims to bury slash-and-burn

The Indonesian government announced last month its own village-based fire prevention programme, which will be developed in 66 cities or districts and 731 villages across seven provinces beginning this year. Forestry experts say communities can only help to reduce the incidence of fires, but not eradicate them. Strong law enforcement against illegal fire setters, including rogue palm oil producers, remains key in tackling the perennial haze problem. Herry Purnomo, a scientist at the Centre for International Forestry Research said that it’s going to be hard for the government to cover all villages.


Swiss govt puts up ‘social forestry’ fund for Asean states

Swiss govt puts up ‘social forestry’ fund for Asean states

The Swiss government has put up a “social forestry” quick response fund for eight Asean states to help in the timely delivery of mitigation efforts to combat climate change, hunger and poverty concerns. The program is the third phase of the ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change (ASFCC). Beneficiary states are the Philippines, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam. Partners in the social forestry program are the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), the Non-Timber Forest Product-Exchange Programme (NTFP-EP), the Center for People and Forests (RECOFTC), and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF).

 


Which Tropical Forest Conservation Strategies Are Proving Most Effective?

Which Tropical Forest Conservation Strategies Are Proving Most Effective?

A multitude of conservation strategies are currently deployed across the tropics in order to curb deforestation, preserve biodiversity, and mitigate global warming. But conservationists and researchers often point to a need for more and better evaluations of the effectiveness of this diversity of conservation initiatives in order to determine what actually works and what doesn’t. An overview study led by Jan Börner of Germany’s University of Bonn and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) focuses on annual forest cover change as a measure of the conservation effects estimated by the 14 studies in the collection. The latest assessment by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization found that Earth’s overall natural forest cover continues to shrink, though at a slower annual rate than in the past. Borner said that reduced deforestation rates may be the result of slower economic growth, decreasing demand for cleared land in urbanizing economies, or a sign that conservation policies are succeeding.

 



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