Media Coverage


First estimate of Congo Basin’s pygmy population comes with warning about increasing threat of deforestation

First estimate of Congo Basin’s pygmy population comes with warning about increasing threat of deforestation

As many as 920,000 pygmies live in the forests of the Congo Basin, and deforestation of Central Africa’s rainforests is not only intensifying the threats to their lives but the survival of their very culture, a new study suggests. “Pygmies are of great significance to humanity’s cultural diversity, as they are the largest group of active hunter-gatherers in Africa, and possibly the world,” John E. Fa of Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK, a senior research associate with the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and one of the study’s lead authors, said in a statement.


L’Afrique centrale compte plus de 900 000 Pygmées (étude)

L’Afrique centrale compte plus de 900 000 Pygmées (étude)

Le nombre de Pygmées vivant en Afrique centrale est estimé à 920.000 personnes, selon une étude internationale à laquelle ont participé des chercheurs de l’Université de Malaga, dans le Sud de l’Espagne. L’étude, dont les conclusions ont été publiées dans la revue scientifique “Plos One”, est la première du genre qui fournit une estimation exacte du nombre de Pygmées vivant dans les forêts tropicales d’Afrique centrale et présente également une carte qui établit sa répartition géographique, selon un communiqué de l’Université de Malaga. L’équipe de scientifiques, dirigée par le professeur John E. Fa, de la Manchester Metropolitan University, en tant que chercheur associé senior avec le Centre pour la recherche forestière internationale (CIFOR), compte aussi le chercheur espagnol Jesus Olivero, chef du groupe de biogéographie et diversité de l’Université de Malaga.


Investigadores de la Universidad de Málaga determina la existencia de casi un millón de pigmeos

Investigadores de la Universidad de Málaga determina la existencia de casi un millón de pigmeos

Un equipo de investigadores de diferentes países, entre los que se encuentran científicos de la Universidad de Málaga (UMA), ha logrado realizar la primera estimación de la población de los pigmeos que habitan en los bosques de África Central, alrededor de 920.000, según han publicado en la prestigiosa revista PLOS ONE. El equipo que ha logrado publicar el artículo ha sido liderado por el profesor John E. Fa, de la Manchester Metropolitan University, asociado como investigador sénior con el Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). Ha trabajado en él también el doctor Jesús Olivero y el grupo de Biogeografía, Diversidad y Conservación del que forma parte en la UMA, así como el doctor Jerome Lewis, prominente antropólogo del University College de Londres, quien ha trabajado intensamente con los Pigmeos en defensa de sus derechos.


Un estudio cifra en 920.000 los pigmeos que habitan en África Central

Un estudio cifra en 920.000 los pigmeos que habitan en África Central

Un equipo de investigadores de diferentes países, entre los que se encuentran científicos de la Universidad de Málaga, ha efectuado una aproximación sobre la población de los pigmeos que habitan en los bosques de África Central, alrededor de 920.000, según han publicado en la revista PLOS ONE. El equipo que ha logrado publicar el artículo ha sido liderado por el profesor John E. Fa, de la Manchester Metropolitan University, asociado como investigador sénior con el Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).


Does sustainable forest management actually protect forests?

Does sustainable forest management actually protect forests?

A team of scientists is questioning whether sustainable forest management (SFM) is as effective as believed, based on their analysis of timber concessions in the Central African nation of the Republic of Congo. Robert Nasi, the deputy director general for research with the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), took issue with the interpretation “that forest management is about reducing deforestation.”The goals of SFM and related certification schemes such as those put forth by the Forestry Stewardship Council are in fact much broader, Nasi said.“Certification is not about reducing deforestation,” he added. “Certification is about better managing forests.”


Zambia’s electricity problem, crisis on country’s forestry sector

Zambia’s electricity problem, crisis on country’s forestry sector

Over the years, demand for charcoal from urban areas has grown exponentially, making charcoal the second source of energy for the burgeoning urban population. In most urban areas where charcoal is used, demand is driven by poverty and limited availability of affordable and cleaner energy alternatives. In the city of Lusaka, about 85 percent of urban households use charcoal, compared to 15 percent in rural areas, according to the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).


Keanekaragaman Hayati

Keanekaragaman Hayati

Dalam khasanah pikiran orang banyak, Kalimantan Barat selalu dihubungkan dengan hutan.  Deborah Lawerence (2004) mengutip laporan FAO bahwa telah terjadi pengalihan penggunaan lahan dari hutan ke pertanian perkebunan yang mencapai 50%. Pengalihan penggunaan lahan dari ini dalam jangka panjang dapat mengubah komposisi spesies dan juga tentu saja mengubah keanekaragaman hayati sekarang ini di Kalimantan Barat. Nick Salafsky dari ‘Biodiversity Support Program’, Washington, DC-USA  dan Eva Wollenberg dari ‘Center for International Forestry Research’, Jakarta, 2000, mengembangkan ‘framework’ yang menghubungkan antara kehidupan sehari-hari dan konservasi dalam dimensi: spesies, habitat, spasial, temporal dan konservasi. Mereka menguji modelnya dalam 39 situs proyek jejaring keanekaragaman hayati. Hasilnya, menggabungkan pola kebutuhan hidup sehari-hari dan konservasi ternyata menunjang keberlangsungan keanekaragaman hayati di sekitar masyarakat setempat.


Is eco-certification the solution to forest destruction?

Is eco-certification the solution to forest destruction?

It’s hard to say for sure whether this has translated into real change on the ground. There have been no comprehensive studies of the FSC’s overall efficacy in preventing forest loss, though some local studies have shown positive results. And a report by the Indonesia-based NGO the Center for International Forestry Research found that communities living in and around FSC-certified forests in Central Africa had significantly better living and working conditions, as well as better relations and less conflict with the companies harvesting them, than those in non-FSC forests.



Top