Media Coverage


Indonesia feels the heat

Indonesia feels the heat

No sooner had the ink dried on the ASEAN Regional Haze Agreement last June when meteorologists announced El Niño was already well under way. It seems Indonesia and its neighbors are in for another six months of fires and smoke costing millions of dollars in economic losses, health costs and environmental damage. While the approaching El Niño is not expected to spark anything like the conflagration of 1997-1998, fires have already started in Kalimantan and Sumatra. People in Pontianak, West Kalimantan are beginning to don face masks while in southern Thailand residents are being advised on safety measures.


Kemudahan Apa Lagi untuk Konglomerat Kehutanan? (Bahasa Indonesia)

Kemudahan Apa Lagi untuk Konglomerat Kehutanan? (Bahasa Indonesia)

Dalam waktu kurang dari sebulan, pemerintah telah mengeluarkan dua kebijakan yang sangat membantu para konglomerat di sektor kehutanan. Pertama, atas usulan BPPN, Komite Kebijakan Sektor Keuangan (KKSK) telah mengeluarkan sebuah kebijakan yang kontraversial dengan memberikan perpanjangan masa pengembalian utang mantan pemegang saham pengendali bank-bank bermasalah yang dikelola oleh BPPN. Kedua, melalui usulan Departemen Perindustrian dan Perdagangan, KKSK meminta BPPN untuk memberikan restrukturisasi utang yang seringan-ringannya kepada perusahaan-perusahaan di sektor kehutanan.



Simple maths on forests

Simple maths on forests

Jakarta Post (2 July 2002) ran a letter reprinted from Koran Tempo about the government’s decision to shut down or reduce the capacity of wood processing companies that lack sufficient legal supply of timber. The author says this is unfair since the government itself is to blame for the fact that companies cannot get enough timber.

The letter misses the most important point. Wood processing industries currently use around 60-70 million cubic meters of wood each year, while Indonesia’s forests can only sustainably produce about one third of that. If that continues the country will soon deplete its resources. This has already happened in Thailand, Nigeria, and the Philippines, which went from being major timber exporters to net importers in just a few decades.


To live and let live: Sustaining Forest Livelihoods (English)

To live and let live: Sustaining Forest Livelihoods (English)

A forest is much more likely to be conserved if the products and services that the forest yields are worth more than the timber standing on it. A wide range of products, especially many "non-timber forest products" (NTFP), have always been important to the livelihoods of forest-dwelling people. Forests provide a safety net for the very poor in times of hardship. They are also a large part of the rural economy, supplying products used in the household and also products for trade. They are sometimes the only source of cash income in a household.


Vivre et laisser vivre: Maintenir les moyens de subsistance forestiers (French)

Vivre et laisser vivre: Maintenir les moyens de subsistance forestiers (French)

Une forêt a beaucoup plus de chances d’être conservée si les produits et les services que l’on en tire valent plus cher que le bois d’œuvre qui s’y trouve. Un vaste éventail de produits, et en particulier beaucoup de < produits forestiers non ligneux > (PFNL), ont toujours joué on rôle important dans les moyens de subsistance des habitants des forês. Les forêts offrent on filet de sécurité aux très pauvres en période de difficulté. Elles constituent aussi on élément important de 1’économie rurale à laquelle elles fournissent des produits domestiques, ainsi que des produits commerciaux. Elles sont parfois la seule source de revenu monétaire d’un ménage.


The struggle for paradise

The struggle for paradise

SUMMARY: Tropical forests are vanishing fast and the loss of biodiversity gives the world plenty to worry about. But the fate of the people who live in those forests is at least as big a concern. Alun Anderson, editor of New Scientist, interviews CIFOR’s Director General, Dr. David Kaimowitz.




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