Media Coverage


Blue Carbon Summit akan Jadi Agenda Nasional

Blue Carbon Summit akan Jadi Agenda Nasional

Kabarriau.com, Lingkungan – Pengarusutamaan karbon biru akan jadi agenda nasional untuk memenuhi komitmen global 17–18 Juli 2018 mendatang.

Global Landscapes Forum melalui media advisory tanggal 26 Jun 2018 mengirim rilisnya melalui email ke meja redaksi kabarriau.com menginformasikan Blue Carbon Summit akan jadi agenda nasional menjelajahi bagaimana potensi karbon biru Indonesia dapat memenuhi agenda pembangunan nasional dan membantu mencapai sasaran iklimnya. Konfrensi Tingkat Tinggi (KTT) pertama untuk membahas bagaimana menempatkan karbon biru pada agenda adaptasi dan mitigasi

KTT ini merupakan inisiatif yang diselenggarakan oleh Akademi Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia (AIPI) bekerja sama dengan Pusat Penelitian Kehutanan Internasional (CIFOR), dan didukung oleh Global Landscape Forum (GLF).

KTT ini akan diselenggarakan pada 17-18 Juli 2018 di Perpustakaan Nasional Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia dan dua hari yang didedikasikan untuk pengembangan karbon biru akan menampilkan:
Ucapan selamat datang oleh HE Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, Menteri Koordinator Bidang Kelautan Republik Indonesia, Pidato Keynote dari Profesor Satryo Soemantri Brodjonegoro, Ketua Akademi Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia dan Robert Nasi, Direktur Jenderal, CIFOR, Pernyataan Penutup oleh HE Bambang Permadi Soemantri Brodjonegoro, Menteri Perencanaan Pembangunan Nasional Indonesia, Kontribusi penting dari para pembicara kami, termasuk: Benjamin Brown, IUCN Mangrove Specialist, Marcel Silvius, perwakilan untuk Global Green Growth Indonesia dan Nyoman Suyadiputra, direktur eksekutif Wetlands International, Indonesia


CIFOR scientists attract media attention for findings on Burkinabe migratory communities

CIFOR scientists attract media attention for findings on Burkinabe migratory communities

On 21 December 2017 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, scientists from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) held a workshop on the roles of gender and natural resources in migratory Burkinabe communities. In a panel discussion facilitated by Poppy Serge, CIFOR consultant Catherine Pehou and CIFOR scientist Mathurin Zida shared findings and results from their research to government ministers, civil society, NGO leaders and students.

Illuminating the need for more internal gender equity and external policy support for the migrants and pastoralists, the workshop attracted attention from local media. The findings have since been covered by the national broadcasting and television of Burkina Faso (RTB) on three radio programs: Magazine la Terre Notre Richesse (18 January 2018), Rendez-vous de la Rédaction (18 March 2018) and Chronique Environnement (7 April 2018).

The online newspaper Lefaso.net also covered the workshop in the article Migration, natural resources and gender: CIFOR establishes a close link.

During the discussion, the scientists explained case studies highlighting issues such as increasing spatial conflicts between pastoralists and indigenous populations, an exodus of migrants’ effects on the national economy, rainfall reduction and water security, fragmentation of forest landscapes and the need for inclusion of women in decision-making processes. One particular session was devoted to migrants life stories told by the migrants themselves (six migrants among whom two women from the project case study sites attended the meeting). Their witness sustained the research results presented and informed a lively debate among the participants.

This research was conducted as part of the broader International Forestry Knowledge (KNOWFOR) Migration project, funded by the UK Department for International Development (UKAID). The project seeks to better understand the states of migratory communities, which account for 3.3% of the global population, in the face of environmental change. Over the course of the past two years, CIFOR scientists have been conducting research in countries across Asia, Africa and Latin America and socializing the results to inform policy and ultimately improve livelihoods.

Listen to the radio broadcasts (in French):


Do environmental advocacy campaigns drive successful forest conservation?

Do environmental advocacy campaigns drive successful forest conservation?

Pablo Pacheco, a principal scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), said that it is probably “reasonable to assume” that companies facing social pressure will tend to more actively support sustainable practices, but that we simply don’t know how much advocacy campaigns actually drive successful implementation of sustainability commitments.

“Much of the zero deforestation commitments have resulted from pressure originated in civil society organizations,” he said. “Nonetheless, there is not too much evidence on what is the extent to which zero deforestation commitments resulting from advocacy campaign[s] are more or less likely to be implemented effectively in comparison to commitments not directly linked to campaigns.”


Draining peatlands leads to greenhouse laughing gas emissions, study shows

Draining peatlands leads to greenhouse laughing gas emissions, study shows

DRAINED PEATLANDS LEAD TO THE SIGNIFICANT RELEASE OF NITROUS OXIDE — A GREENHOUSE GAS ALSO KNOWN COLLOQUIALLY AS LAUGHING GAS — LEADING TO GLOBAL WARMING, ACCORDING TO A NEW STUDY PUBLISHED IN NATURE COMMUNICATIONS.

Julie Mollins is editor, Landscapes News; and is formerly news editor and media manager at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Mexico (2014-2017), editor of Forests News at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) in Indonesia (2013-2014). Worked at Reuters (2005-2011) in Toronto and London, and the Thomson Reuters Foundation (2011-2013) in London in several roles, including web editor, web producer and communities editor.



Indonesia’s forests are continuing to suffer from growing deforestation despite government pledges

Indonesia’s forests are continuing to suffer from growing deforestation despite government pledges

According to Shintia Arwida, a scientist at the Indonesia-based Center for International Forestry Research, the government has finally established a unit that will serve as the primary funding mechanism, a key step toward receiving and dispersing REDD+ payments. So far, however, forest conservation in Indonesia has taken a back seat to economic development, which depends on expanding the very industries responsible for deforestation and fires. A case in point: Plans are going forward to build 3 million acres of sugar and oil palm plantations in Indonesian Papua, one of the few regions of the country that has yet to see massive deforestation.


Greenpeace International ends its Forest Stewardship Council membership

Greenpeace International ends its Forest Stewardship Council membership

Greenpeace International confirmed that it would not seek membership with other “weaker forest certification schemes” such as the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification.

In an interview, FSC director general Kim Carstensen said that losing a member organisation that helped to found the FSC in 1994 was “of course sad.” But Carstensen pointed to a 2014 study of FSC-certified concessions in the Congo Basin by the Center for International Forestry Research, or CIFOR. He said the researchers found that FSC certification delivered on its promises, even in “the area of the world that’s most difficult to work in.”


Sedihnya Duta Earth Hour Lihat Mangrove Benoa Bali Tersisa 1%. Kok Bisa?

Sedihnya Duta Earth Hour Lihat Mangrove Benoa Bali Tersisa 1%. Kok Bisa?

WWF bersama IUCN dan CIFOR tiap 2 tahun buat indeks kesehatan bumi seperti terangkum dalam oceanpanda.org/#report dan dalam laporan terakhir degradasi habitat dan keanekaragaman hayati makin memprihatinkan. Di sektor kelautan dan perikanan secara global ikan di hotel dan laut status tereksploitasi 61%. “Sudah habis separuhnya. Artinya bahan makan berkurang, tanya saja nelayan. Harga ikan makin mahal karena susah cari ikan sehingga biaya operasional tinggi,” urai Imam.

Spesies laut yang sudah hilang 39% sehingga rantai makanan tak seimbang. Selain itu terumbu karang yang jadi rumah laut dan biomassa terbesar ini hilang 50%. Air laut tak bisa dibendung saling terhubung. Pada 2050 temperatur permukaan air laut meningkat tajam, terumbu bisa hilang karena berkorelasi dengan alga yang beri warna dan hidupi karang.



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