Media Coverage


Do environmental advocacy campaigns drive successful forest conservation?

Do environmental advocacy campaigns drive successful forest conservation?

Pablo Pacheco, a principal scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), said that it is probably “reasonable to assume” that companies facing social pressure will tend to more actively support sustainable practices, but that we simply don’t know how much advocacy campaigns actually drive successful implementation of sustainability commitments.

“Much of the zero deforestation commitments have resulted from pressure originated in civil society organizations,” he said. “Nonetheless, there is not too much evidence on what is the extent to which zero deforestation commitments resulting from advocacy campaign[s] are more or less likely to be implemented effectively in comparison to commitments not directly linked to campaigns.”


Draining peatlands leads to greenhouse laughing gas emissions, study shows

Draining peatlands leads to greenhouse laughing gas emissions, study shows

DRAINED PEATLANDS LEAD TO THE SIGNIFICANT RELEASE OF NITROUS OXIDE — A GREENHOUSE GAS ALSO KNOWN COLLOQUIALLY AS LAUGHING GAS — LEADING TO GLOBAL WARMING, ACCORDING TO A NEW STUDY PUBLISHED IN NATURE COMMUNICATIONS.

Julie Mollins is editor, Landscapes News; and is formerly news editor and media manager at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Mexico (2014-2017), editor of Forests News at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) in Indonesia (2013-2014). Worked at Reuters (2005-2011) in Toronto and London, and the Thomson Reuters Foundation (2011-2013) in London in several roles, including web editor, web producer and communities editor.



Indonesia’s forests are continuing to suffer from growing deforestation despite government pledges

Indonesia’s forests are continuing to suffer from growing deforestation despite government pledges

According to Shintia Arwida, a scientist at the Indonesia-based Center for International Forestry Research, the government has finally established a unit that will serve as the primary funding mechanism, a key step toward receiving and dispersing REDD+ payments. So far, however, forest conservation in Indonesia has taken a back seat to economic development, which depends on expanding the very industries responsible for deforestation and fires. A case in point: Plans are going forward to build 3 million acres of sugar and oil palm plantations in Indonesian Papua, one of the few regions of the country that has yet to see massive deforestation.


Greenpeace International ends its Forest Stewardship Council membership

Greenpeace International ends its Forest Stewardship Council membership

Greenpeace International confirmed that it would not seek membership with other “weaker forest certification schemes” such as the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification.

In an interview, FSC director general Kim Carstensen said that losing a member organisation that helped to found the FSC in 1994 was “of course sad.” But Carstensen pointed to a 2014 study of FSC-certified concessions in the Congo Basin by the Center for International Forestry Research, or CIFOR. He said the researchers found that FSC certification delivered on its promises, even in “the area of the world that’s most difficult to work in.”


Sedihnya Duta Earth Hour Lihat Mangrove Benoa Bali Tersisa 1%. Kok Bisa?

Sedihnya Duta Earth Hour Lihat Mangrove Benoa Bali Tersisa 1%. Kok Bisa?

WWF bersama IUCN dan CIFOR tiap 2 tahun buat indeks kesehatan bumi seperti terangkum dalam oceanpanda.org/#report dan dalam laporan terakhir degradasi habitat dan keanekaragaman hayati makin memprihatinkan. Di sektor kelautan dan perikanan secara global ikan di hotel dan laut status tereksploitasi 61%. “Sudah habis separuhnya. Artinya bahan makan berkurang, tanya saja nelayan. Harga ikan makin mahal karena susah cari ikan sehingga biaya operasional tinggi,” urai Imam.

Spesies laut yang sudah hilang 39% sehingga rantai makanan tak seimbang. Selain itu terumbu karang yang jadi rumah laut dan biomassa terbesar ini hilang 50%. Air laut tak bisa dibendung saling terhubung. Pada 2050 temperatur permukaan air laut meningkat tajam, terumbu bisa hilang karena berkorelasi dengan alga yang beri warna dan hidupi karang.


CIFOR scientists join radio broadcast on tenure reform in Indonesia

CIFOR scientists join radio broadcast on tenure reform in Indonesia

National broadcaster RRI (Radio Republik Indonesia) hosted a radio discussion on tenure reform from 19:30-20:00 on 11 November 2017, featuring researchers Tuti Herawati and Nining Liswanti from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Listen to the broadcast here (in Bahasa Indonesia):

Broadcast through the regional station RRI Pro-1 FM Bandar Lampung, the discussion focused on the implementation of tenure reform with the aim to secure the rights of forest-adjacent communities in the province of Lampung, where the scientists are conducting research as part of CIFOR’s Global Comparative Study on Forest Tenure Reform (GCS-Tenure). The main avenue for implementation in the province has been through a government Social Forestry program, which was discussed in detail during the broadcast.

Also joining the discussion were Ir. Syaiful Bachri, MM, Head of the Lampung Forestry Office; Ir. Warsito, MM, from the Lampung Social Forestry Working Group and Ir. Edi Kariza from the non-governmental organization WATALA (Keluarga Pecinta Alam dan Lingkungan Hidup, or Friends for Nature and the Environment).

During the dialogue, Ir. Syaiful Bachri stated that Lampung is a pioneer in the implementation of Social Forestry programs in Indonesia, having secured the legal management of 184,000 hectares of forest by 110,000 families. He praised the scheme for encouraging cooperation between governments and communities, from governments granting legitimate forest management rights to communities, to communities helping the government in its aims to restore and conserve forests.

CIFOR scientist Tuti Herawati gave analysis from her research team’s results so far, saying there are indications that the Social Forestry program in Lampung had made positive impacts on community livelihoods, even providing the main source of income for some families. Ecologically, the scheme has also showed positive contributions to increasing the amount of forest cover, she said.

 


Places to Watch: 3 Forest Regions at Risk Right Now

Places to Watch: 3 Forest Regions at Risk Right Now

The rubber plantation is owned by Sudcam, a subsidiary of the world’s largest natural rubber company Halcyon Agri Corporation, with a China-based parent company Sinochem International.  According to a CIFOR report, Sudcam has come under scrutiny because the plantation expansion involves clearing of “some 40,000 hectares of natural forests” buffering a park with rich biodiversity and protected species. The report notes that while the project has the potential to create needed employment in the areas, many of the communities are not eligible for compensation for loss of customary land to the plantation as Cameroonian expropriation laws do not recognize customary rights. UNESCO authorities and Greenpeace have raised concerns over the project’s impacts on community rights and the Dja Wildlife reserve.



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