Projects - Forests and Gender

Projects


Gender integration in the Nyimba Forest project, Zambia

Gender integration in the Nyimba Forest project, Zambia

The project ‘Developing models for measuring, reporting and verification (MRV) for REDD+ in the Miombo socioecological system: utilising opportunities under Zambia’s UN-REDD+ quick-start programme’, known as the Nyimba Forest Project (NFP) is implemented by Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) with support from USAID/Zambia Economic Growth Program. The main focus of the project is to provide support to Zambia’s REDD+ Readiness Programme by conducting additional in-depth studies and assessments on livelihoods, forests resources and providing recommendations for incorporation into the design of the national REDD+ strategy for Zambia.


Gender, forest management and climate policy in Burkina Faso

Gender, forest management and climate policy in Burkina Faso

This study is part of ongoing collaboration between the University of Gothenburg and CIFOR to develop indicators or ways to measure impacts from Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) interventions in Burkina Faso. Focus will lie on different ways of analyzing impacts on time use and division of labor for natural resources. The division of labor can provide a useful measure of inequality or changing gender roles.


Gender dynamics in consultation and decision-making mechanisms in forest concessions in the Republic of Congo

Gender dynamics in consultation and decision-making mechanisms in forest concessions in the Republic of Congo

Despite years of ‘gender mainstreaming’ being a buzzword in the development community, the author of this study argues that we are crucially lacking gender-disaggregated statistics on participation levels in forest management. The context to the study is the implementation of REDD+ in the Congo Basin. For the program to be successful, understanding women’s and men’s needs, roles, uses and knowledge are key, as failing to include women in decision-making could potentially result in gendered impacts that are harmful to women.


How do gender disparities in access to and use of forest assets affect household food and nutrition security? A systematic review protocol

How do gender disparities in access to and use of forest assets affect household food and nutrition security? A systematic review protocol

Several studies have shown that women play a vital role in a household’s food and nutritional security while they, relative to men, often have less access and control over productive assets, including land, finance and extension services. Furthermore, the literature indicates that gender inequalities may lead to decreased food production, less diverse consumption patterns, decreased household income, pervasive poverty and food and nutrition insecurity.


Gender, migration and forest governance: Lessons from Nepal

Gender, migration and forest governance: Lessons from Nepal

Rural livelihoods in the global South are becoming increasingly diversified and are no longer derived exclusively from farming and land. Seasonal and circular migration of some of the members of the household has become the main livelihood strategy. Household income is sourced from multiple localities, often beyond rural boundaries.


Gender and oil palm in Indonesia

Gender and oil palm in Indonesia

The rapid expansion of oil palm in Indonesia, the largest oil palm exporting country globally, remains highly contested from a forestry and development perspective. On the one hand, as the cheapest edible oil, oil palm has become the primary cooking oil for millions of poor people in developing countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America.


Gender-equitable rights and access to forest and tree resources and benefits: A mixed methods approach in Uganda and Nicaragua

Gender-equitable rights and access to forest and tree resources and benefits: A mixed methods approach in Uganda and Nicaragua

Although the policy environment for addressing gender inequity has improved over the past decade, women continue to be disadvantaged by insecure access and property rights to forest, trees and land resources; by discrimination and male bias in the provision of services, including credit and technology; and by exclusion from decision-making at household, community and national levels.




On the balance of power in household decision-making: A gender analysis in southern Sulawesi

On the balance of power in household decision-making: A gender analysis in southern Sulawesi

Women are often portrayed as homemakers and passive victims of gendered oppression in the literature on gender, forestry and agroforestry. Earlier studies aimed at including women in development have to some extent fed into this bias, focusing largely on women’s contributions in the productive, traditionally ‘male-coded’ spheres, rather than appreciating women’s roles in the reproductive, private spheres.




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