Coffee, climate change, forest rights and a new chapter for the Global Landscapes Forum

GLF BONN 2017

More than 1,000 people from 104 countries joined the launch of the new five-year phase of the Global Landscapes Forum (GLF) from 19-20 December 2017 in Bonn, Germany. More than 51,000 people from 114 countries engaged online, with an audience of over 38 million people connected through social media channels – the largest online participation in any event of its kind in the history of CGIAR. Closing its fifth year, the GLF in Bonn embarked on a new chapter with the launch of its 2018-2022 program, supported by core funding from the German Government, with the aim of sparking a global movement of one billion people to build sustainable landscapes and contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement.

More about the event
Best of GLF in 2017

COMING SOON IN 2018

GLF: The Investment Case

Washington, DC, USA – 29 May, 2018

GLF: Restoring Africa’s Degraded Lands

Nairobi, Kenya – September 2018

GLF Bonn 2018

Bonn, Germany – 1-2 December 2018

GLF @ COP24

Katowice, Poland – 3-14 December 2018

JOIN THE GLF MOVEMENT

In 2018, we’ll carry out global summits, national dialogues, and learning and youth programs, ensuring that key learning, knowledge and actions discussed during all GLF activities are creating an impact with communities within landscapes.
True to our focus on community, on 19 February in Rome, Italy, the GLF will facilitate a workshop to train 50 young leaders from across sectors to be “restoration ready”. Keep an eye out for our online photo and video competitions, as well as Digital Summits, hosting key discussions around GLF themes. Stay connected to GLF social media channels for more information.

The Global Landscapes Forum is much more than a sum of its events. And we have only just begun.

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FORESTS NEWS

Scientists find good coffee needs trees – and bees
As climate change affects coffee crops, a new study finds that nearby forests and the bees they host could help safeguard productivity. Photo by Flickr user fredo

A changing global climate could stir up the coffee world as temperature and rainfall patterns shift, affecting crops. But there’s another climate connection keeping the buzz in your morning cup of joe: bees from nearby forests. In CIFOR’s most popular publication of 2017, scientists examined the connections between climate change, coffee crops and forest bees, whose role as pollinators is helping to keep the good bean going.

“At a time when agricultural production is threatened by climate change, the ecosystem services provided by forests—in this case, pollination—can help farmers cope and adapt,” says Bruno Locatelli, study co-author and an expert on ecosystem services and climate change adaptation at CIFOR.

Read on to find out what forests and bees are doing for your morning brew.

ENERGY AND CLIMATE
Should we burn trees for energy?
CIFOR’s Robert Nasi weighs in on the EU debate over forest biomass
SEE ALSO
Transparent data needed to reach global goals on climate
At the Global Landscapes Forum, exploring common standards of data transparency in the land-use sector
Precipitation and its relation to vegetation
Links between forests and water examined at the Global Landscapes Forum
Funding a low-carbon future
Unlocking private finance for climate and sustainable development
Women producing charcoal in Zambia
(Or the costs and benefits of challenging the patriarchy)
TENURE REFORM
‘The forest belongs to the community’
Making the call for tenure reform in Maluku, Indonesia
SEE ALSO
The power of ‘sasi’: A sustainable taboo
How sticks, signs and crucifixes help manage forests in Maluku
The forest farmers
Indigenous voices on tenure insecurity in Maluku
Postcards from the field: The view from Honitetu
Scientist Nining Liswanti shares her experiences in Maluku
In Uganda, change is afoot for rights to forests
New research looks at community roles in tenure reform
Women left out of forest decisions
On the sidelines of tenure and rights in Latin America’s forests
RESTORATION
40 years of restoration in Nepal
How government and community efforts have revitalized forest landscapes
SEE ALSO
In China, paying farmers to restore forest landscapes
How cash incentives are helping to swap ‘grain for green’
How happiness impacts forestry (and vice versa) in Bhutan
Finding the connections between forests and Gross National Happiness
READ MORE ON FORESTS NEWS ›
FEATURED PUBLICATIONS
JOURNAL
Forest Landscape Restoration in Hilly and Mountainous Regions: Special Issue
JOURNAL
Managing palm oil risks: A Brief for financiers
JOURNAL
Greenhouse gas emissions in restored secondary tropical peat swamp forests
JOURNAL
Reducing forest and land fires through good palm oil value chain governance
INFOBRIEF
Upgrading Tanzania’s artisanal and small-scale mining through investor partnerships: Opportunities and challenges
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JOBS
Research Officer
Policy Facilitator
Consultant for Scientific Writing
Director, Human Resources
General Call for Applications – Consultant Roster
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UPCOMING EVENTS
World Symposium on Climate Change Communication
7 - 9 February 2018, Graz, Austria.
International Conference Working across Sectors to Halt Deforestation and Increase Forest Area – from Aspiration to Action
20 - 22 February 2018, FAO Headquarters, Rome, Italy.
Cities & Climate Change Science Conference
5 March 2018, Shaw Conference Centre, Edmonton, Canada.
World Ocean Summit 2018
7 - 9 March 2018, Riviera Maya, Playa del Carmen, Mexico.
VIEW ALL EVENTS ›
CIFOR Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)
CIFOR is a CGIAR Research Center

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