From heartwood to bark in Indonesia: gender and sustainable forest management

From heartwood to bark in Indonesia: gender and sustainable forest management

CIFOR has been testing criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management since 1994. Researchers in that project use many methods to test for local people’s views of their access to the forest. They are interested in the people’s sense of co-management of resources. The researchers evaluate what they find through testing against their own qualitative understanding based on long-term, ethnographic work. Using the analogy of a tropical tree, the authors document their continuing attempts to assess gender issues as they pertain to human well being and sustainable forest management. The work is based on the assumption that forests cannot be sustainably managed until appropriate attention is paid to the people who inhabit those forests – both women and men. Researchers’ abilities to assess women’s security of intergenerational access to resources simply, quickly and reliably was found to be in need of further attention.

Authors: Colfer, C.J.P.; Wadley, R.L.; Woelfel, J.; Harwell, E.

Topic: gender,tenure,forest management,gender relations,sustainability,forest products

Geographic: Indonesia

Publication Year: 1997

Source: Women in Natural Resources Proceedings of International Conference on women in the Asia-Pacific Region: Persons, Powers and Politics 11-13 August 1997, RELC, Singapore. 7-14; 178-195


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