Reclaiming collective rights: land and forest tenure reforms in Peru (1960-2016)

Reclaiming collective rights: land and forest tenure reforms in Peru (1960-2016)

In Peru, since 1974, more than 1,200 communities have been titled in the Amazon for over 12 million hectares, representing about 20% of the country’s national forest area. This working paper analyzes policy and regulatory changes that have influenced how indigenous peoples access, use and manage forest and land resources in the Peruvian Amazon during the last fifty years. It reviews the main motivations behind changes, the institutional structures defined by law and the outcomes of these changes in practice. The paper discusses political priorities related to land and forest tenure, social actors involved in reform debates and the mechanisms used for recognizing indigenous rights claims. The paper argues that there has not been a single reform process in Peru; instead multiple reforms have shaped forest tenure rights, contributing to both progress and setbacks for indigenous people and communities. This working paper is part of a global comparative research initiative that is analyzing reform processes that recognize collective tenure rights to forests and land in six countries in highly forested regions.

Authors: Monterroso, I.; Cronkleton, P.; Pinedo, D.; Larson, A.M.

Topic: land tenure, land ownership, land policy, forest ownership, forest management, indigenous people

Geographic: Peru

Series: CIFOR Working Paper no. 224

Pages: 31p

Publisher: Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Bogor, Indonesia

Publication Year: 2017

DOI: 10.17528/cifor/006426


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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