Tenure issues in REDD+ pilot project sites in Tanzania

Tenure issues in REDD+ pilot project sites in Tanzania

REDD+ has been proposed as a viable option for addressing climate change in the near term, and at relatively low cost. There is a broad consensus that clearly defined tenure rights are important for the implementation and success of REDD+, both to manage forests effectively and to protect local communities’ livelihoods. We use primary data from 23 villages in six REDD+ pilot sites in Tanzania to identify causes of deforestation and forest degradation, and tenure rights issues, at the village level prior to project implementation. Further, interviews with project proponents and examination of project documents yields insights into how the proponents plan to address tenure issues. Most villages perceive their tenure as secure and have exclusion rights, while collective action challenges are prevalent in villages experiencing deforestation and forest degradation. These findings suggest that the main tenure issues are related to internal institutional arrangements. While we find that tenure is high on the agenda for all the project proponents, they are mainly focusing on formalization and securing tenure rights from state to community level. Though we do find this to be a precondition for reducing deforestation and degradation, some of their focus should be shifted to strengthening village institutions and enhancing internal compliance

Authors: Dokken, T.; Caplow, S.; Angelsen, A.; Sunderlin, W.D.

Topic: community forestry,deforestation,degradation,property rights,tenure rights,tenure systems

Geographic: Tanzania

Publication Year: 2014

ISSN: 1999-4907

Source: Forests 5(2): 234-255

DOI: 10.3390/f5020234

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