GLOBAL WETLANDS




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Access maps and data on wetlands, peatlands and carbon stocks

Visitors can freely access and explore maps and data without a login.

  • Scroll, use the buttons (+ and -) to zoom in and out, or click and drag to move the map in any direction.
  • Click to pull out the Legend tab on the right-hand side, or click the red points for more information.
  • Change the Map View by selecting datasets on Wetlands, Peatlands or Carbon Stocks at the bottom of the screen.

 

 

 

About

Wetlands play a fundamental role in climate change mitigation, and provide essential ecosystem services. Yet there is still a lot we don’t know about their precise distribution, extent and inter-annual variability around the world, particularly in the tropics.

The Global Wetlands Map is an initiative to collect and share information on tropical wetlands in a visual format. Users can access data and contribute their own, using standard geographic information systems software such as ArcGIS.

Explore the interactive web-based map, to contribute and verify data, or download the datasets to conduct your own analysis.

The Global Wetlands Map is produced by the Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Program (SWAMP), a collaborative effort between the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and the United States Forest Service, supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA).

        

Contribute

Verify data or add your own

Registered users are invited to review the datasets and submit new data.

  • Use an existing Google account or register to create a new account.
  • to give feedback on the accuracy of points on the map, or add areas that haven’t been mapped yet.
  • Simply use the Click to Verify function to select the type of feature you would like to submit, then fill in a site name, verification type and comment regarding your contribution.
  • Click Save to add your point to the map.

Download

Download datasets to conduct your own analysis and do further work

Download the data in a GeoTIFF format in its original resolution (approximately 236 m) to conduct further work using ArcGIS.

  • Find the Available Datasets at the bottom of the map, and click Download to access datasets from CIFOR’s research data repository website.
  • Click Data & Analysis, fill in the Guest Book, and agree to the Terms of Use to proceed with your download.


Explore


Access maps and data on wetlands, peat and carbon stocks.



Contribute


Verify data or add your own.



Download


Download datasets to conduct your own analysis and do further work

LEGEND

Map View

Wetlands | Peat depth | Peat | Organic carbon content | Carbon stocks



AVAILABLE DATASETS



Wetlands


Peat depth


Peat

Data description:

The dataset shows distribution of wetland that covers the tropics and sub tropics (40° N to 60° S; 180° E to -180° W), excluding small islands. It was mapped in 231 meters spatial resolution by using transparent rules on hydrological wetness, satellite-derived soil wetness phenology, and geomorphology. Our method develops three biophysical indices that capture three key properties of wetlands: 1. Long-term water supply exceeding the atmospheric water demand; 2. Annually or seasonally water logged soils; 3. A geomorphological position where water can be supplied and retained. The dataset consist of 10 classes: open water (10), mangroves (20), swamps/bogs (30), fens (40), riverine/lacustrine (50), floodout-swamps (60), floodplains and intermittent water bodies (70), marshes (80), , wetland in arid climates (90), and wet meadow (100). In parenthesis, the class codes that appear in the map.

Please cite this work as:

Gumbricht et al. (2017) An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor. Global Change Biology. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13689

Data description:

To estimate depth we assumed that the terrain relief maps represent the metric distance from the ground surface of wetlands to their mineral bedding, but with certain maximum depths allowed for each wetland category. In effect, this means that:

1. We assume that coastal peat domes have their basal level at sea level, and that inland peat domes have their basal level coinciding with the levels of adjacent rivers. This is an over-simplification, but data on the depth and minerogenic bedding of peat domes in South East Asia support this assumption.

2. Extended alluvial deposits that host many of the largest pantropical wetlands (i.e. Pantanal in South America, the Sudd, the Niger Inland Delta, and the Okavango in Africa, the Indo-Ganges plateau, etc. have surfaces almost perfectly aligned with the geoid. These wetlands can then be assumed to have a near planar mineral bedding, with a high degree of certainty. The major error for plain-bound wetlands probably more likely stems from errors in the SRTM DEM data rather than the assumption of planarity itself.

3. Valley-bound wetlands and wetlands on open slopes, can have highly varying topographic bedding conditions. Anticipating that these wetlands initially developed at level with the channel or stream, we assume that the mineral bedding is near the level of the adjacent channel or open water, and that the depth follows then the general terrain slope. We believe that depth estimates for these wetlands are the most uncertain.

A validation of our depth map against ground measured peat depths (i.e. soil profiles) suggests that our deepest values (>10m) overestimate depth. For this reason, all depths >10m have been thresholded to 10m.

Please cite this work as:

Gumbricht et al. (2017) An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor. Global Change Biology. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13689

Data description:

Peat is here defined as any soil having at least 30cm of decomposed or semi-decomposed organic material with at least 50% of organic matter. This corresponds to 29% of carbon content using 1.72 as the transformation factor. The peat map is produced by adding the peat forming wetlands: mangrove (20), swamp/bog (30), Fen (40), riverine (50), and floodswamps (60) (note: the number in parentheses refer to pixel code of each class in Wetlands dataset). This maps maintains wetlands’ spatial resolution and methodology. Our map of peat was contrasted against n=275 geo-positioned soil profiles containing peat, with 65% of agreement. Further fieldwork is however needed to validate our map. Mangroves are here considered to host the thresholds of depth and organic matter content needed for peat definition, although mineral soil may prevail. Mangroves contribute with ca. 180,000 km2 to the 1.7 million km2 of peatlands (11%), which would need further ground validation (i.e. in areas like Indonesian Papua have large extents of mangrove that contribute to peat, which would need ground-truthing to validate if they contain peat as defined here).

Please cite this work as:

Gumbricht et al. (2017) An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor. Global Change Biology. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13689


Organic carbon content


Carbon Stocks

Data description:

This dataset represents organic carbon stock for the upper 30cm in MgC.ha-1. The data derived from ISRIC’s website: http://www.isric.org/content/soilgrids (OCSTHA_sd1 + sd2+ sd3.tif) and it is the product of interpolating >150 co-variables to reproduce three soil variables for the upper 30cm: carbon content, bulk density and coarse fraction maps, based on n>2000 soil profiles. Carbon stocks combine these three variables and offer aggregated carbon stocks for both organic and mineral soils.

Data description:

Forest carbon database system (ForestCDB) is part of the effort to support initiatives such as greenhouse gas inventories, the development of forest reference emission level, monitoring, reporting and verification. ForestCDB invites its visitors, especially those who maintain forest inventory data, manage permanent sample plots or conduct research on carbon stocks, to participate in this initiative. ForestCDB accommodates carbon stocks in five carbon pools: above- and belowground biomass, woody debris and litter, understorey and soil. As a Meta Database, it also provides general information related to the site, such as geographic location, land cover or forest type, and climate and soil.

Citation:

CIFOR. 2014. Forest Carbon Database. URL:

 

Wetlands

Data description:

The dataset shows distribution of wetland that covers the tropics and sub tropics (40° N to 60° S; 180° E to -180° W), excluding small islands. It was mapped in 231 meters spatial resolution by using transparent rules on hydrological wetness, satellite-derived soil wetness phenology, and geomorphology. Our method develops three biophysical indices that capture three key properties of wetlands: 1. Long-term water supply exceeding the atmospheric water demand; 2. Annually or seasonally water logged soils; 3. A geomorphological position where water can be supplied and retained. The dataset consist of 10 classes: open water (10), mangroves (20), swamps/bogs (30), fens (40), riverine/lacustrine (50), floodout-swamps (60), floodplains and intermittent water bodies (70), marshes (80), , wetland in arid climates (90), and wet meadow (100). In parenthesis, the class codes that appear in the map.

Please cite this work as:

Gumbricht et al. (2017) An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor. Global Change Biology. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13689


Peat depth

Data description:

To estimate depth we assumed that the terrain relief maps represent the metric distance from the ground surface of wetlands to their mineral bedding, but with certain maximum depths allowed for each wetland category. In effect, this means that:

1. We assume that coastal peat domes have their basal level at sea level, and that inland peat domes have their basal level coinciding with the levels of adjacent rivers. This is an over-simplification, but data on the depth and minerogenic bedding of peat domes in South East Asia support this assumption.

2. Extended alluvial deposits that host many of the largest pantropical wetlands (i.e. Pantanal in South America, the Sudd, the Niger Inland Delta, and the Okavango in Africa, the Indo-Ganges plateau, etc. have surfaces almost perfectly aligned with the geoid. These wetlands can then be assumed to have a near planar mineral bedding, with a high degree of certainty. The major error for plain-bound wetlands probably more likely stems from errors in the SRTM DEM data rather than the assumption of planarity itself.

3. Valley-bound wetlands and wetlands on open slopes, can have highly varying topographic bedding conditions. Anticipating that these wetlands initially developed at level with the channel or stream, we assume that the mineral bedding is near the level of the adjacent channel or open water, and that the depth follows then the general terrain slope. We believe that depth estimates for these wetlands are the most uncertain.

A validation of our depth map against ground measured peat depths (i.e. soil profiles) suggests that our deepest values (>10m) overestimate depth. For this reason, all depths >10m have been thresholded to 10m.

Please cite this work as:

Gumbricht et al. (2017) An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor. Global Change Biology. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13689


Peat

Data description:

Peat is here defined as any soil having at least 30cm of decomposed or semi-decomposed organic material with at least 50% of organic matter. This corresponds to 29% of carbon content using 1.72 as the transformation factor. The peat map is produced by adding the peat forming wetlands: mangrove (20), swamp/bog (30), Fen (40), riverine (50), and floodswamps (60) (note: the number in parentheses refer to pixel code of each class in Wetlands dataset). This maps maintains wetlands’ spatial resolution and methodology. Our map of peat was contrasted against n=275 geo-positioned soil profiles containing peat, with 65% of agreement. Further fieldwork is however needed to validate our map. Mangroves are here considered to host the thresholds of depth and organic matter content needed for peat definition, although mineral soil may prevail. Mangroves contribute with ca. 180,000 km2 to the 1.7 million km2 of peatlands (11%), which would need further ground validation (i.e. in areas like Indonesian Papua have large extents of mangrove that contribute to peat, which would need ground-truthing to validate if they contain peat as defined here).

Please cite this work as:

Gumbricht et al. (2017) An expert system model for mapping tropical wetlands and peatlands reveals South America as the largest contributor. Global Change Biology. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13689


Organic carbon content

Data description:

This dataset represents organic carbon stock for the upper 30cm in MgC.ha-1. The data derived from ISRIC’s website: http://www.isric.org/content/soilgrids (OCSTHA_sd1 + sd2+ sd3.tif) and it is the product of interpolating >150 co-variables to reproduce three soil variables for the upper 30cm: carbon content, bulk density and coarse fraction maps, based on n>2000 soil profiles. Carbon stocks combine these three variables and offer aggregated carbon stocks for both organic and mineral soils.


Carbon Stocks

Data description:

Forest carbon database system (ForestCDB) is part of the effort to support initiatives such as greenhouse gas inventories, the development of forest reference emission level, monitoring, reporting and verification. ForestCDB invites its visitors, especially those who maintain forest inventory data, manage permanent sample plots or conduct research on carbon stocks, to participate in this initiative. ForestCDB accommodates carbon stocks in five carbon pools: above- and belowground biomass, woody debris and litter, understorey and soil. As a Meta Database, it also provides general information related to the site, such as geographic location, land cover or forest type, and climate and soil.

Citation:

CIFOR. 2014. Forest Carbon Database. URL:

 


        
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