Scott Poynton

scott_poynton.360

Executive Director,  The Forest Trust

Scott Poynton believes that cleaning up global supply chains is the way to protect the environment, and he has made this his life’s work.

Using his experience as a forester, he set up TFT in 1999 and is helping some of the world’s largest companies transform the way they source their products. Scott’s model for change in timber is now being widely applied across other product groups, including palm oil, leather and stone. Scott’s work protects the environment and improves the lives of people around the world.

Every day, media headlines show what damage can be done by companies’ ignorance of where their products come from, but Scott is proving that with real commitment to change, companies can be a force for good.

Scott’s enthusiasm, passion and drive to help companies become more responsible has helped grow TFT into a global not-for-profit organisation with more than 90 member companies and over 100 committed staff across 14 countries, including Brazil, Indonesia, Cameroon, Vietnam, India, China and the US. TFT’s work has so far impacted over eight million hectares of the world’s forests, billions of dollars worth of products and improved hundreds of thousands of lives. Working between these two worlds, of business and nature, Scott brings people together and mediates to turn seemingly impossible situations around to benefit all parties.

Whilst setting up TFT, Scott was Managing Director of the Vietnam subsidiary of ScanCom International, the world’s largest supplier of wooden outdoor furniture products. At ScanCom he presided over tremendous growth while simultaneously shifting the company’s entire production for the European market to Forest Stewardship Council certification.

For the World Bank and other clients, Scott has led forestry-related economic development efforts in Romania, Viet Nam, India, Laos, Russia and Papua New Guinea.

He holds a Master of Science in Forestry from Oxford University, where he was awarded the prestigious Oxford Forestry Institute’s Jubilee Prize.