Learning event tackles the challenges and future of forestry education

Observing the mangroves in a study on above-ground and below-ground biomass in mangrove ecosystems, part of Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Program (SWAMP). Kubu Raya, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Kate Evans, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Observing the mangroves in a study on above-ground and below-ground biomass in mangrove ecosystems, part of Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Program (SWAMP). Kubu Raya, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Kate Evans, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Increased global awareness of the value of forests has almost out-paced forestry education, leaving it behind and threatening a deficit in future capacity. A learning event on the first day of the Summit will highlight the current state of forestry education and the opportunities it presents for Asia to lead the way forward.

The forestry sector itself has undergone major change, from a focus on products such as timber, to an industry with multiple benefits – some tangible and some not – including watershed management, biodiversity habitats, carbon stores and non-timber forest products. Yet forest education facilities are reporting a decline in student numbers and even in facilities themselves.

In the learning event, the ASEAN-Korea Forest Cooperation Organization will discuss the realities of forest education as it currently stands, taking into account the perspectives of students and the needs of society. They will present the challenges that face forestry education and map out gaps and priorities that future education systems need to adapt to.

Read more about the learning event here.

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