Indonesian province explores ‘green growth’ amidst economic expansion

The rush to supply the world with pulp, paper, coal, nickel, tin and palm oil has seen more than half of Indonesia’s forest cleared. Mokhamad Edliadi/CIFOR

The rush to supply the world with pulp, paper, coal, nickel, tin and palm oil has seen more than half of Indonesia’s forest cleared. Mokhamad Edliadi/CIFOR

Indonesia’s resource-rich province of East Kalimantan has two seemingly incompatible goals: By the end of the decade it says it wants to absorb US$70 billion in investments from palm oil, timber and mining companies and to slash carbon emissions from forest loss and land degradation by more than 15 percent.

But stakeholders who gathered recently in the city of Samarinda to develop a “green growth” approach to economic development were hopeful both may be possible.

Developing countries all over the world are trying to find ways to bridge the gap between economic growth and climate change — something that is likely to vary not only from one nation to another, but also at subnational levels.

Click here to find out what suggestions came out of the gathering in Samarinda.