What is the biggest challenge in REDD+ planning and implementation?

Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) Director General, Peter Holmgren (right) talks to the President of Indonesia Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono at Forests Asia Summit 2014 in the Shangri-La Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo for Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) Director General, Peter Holmgren (right) talks to the President of Indonesia Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono at Forests Asia Summit 2014 in the Shangri-La Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo for Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

The participants of the 2014 Forests Asia Summit gathered at the Shangri-La Hotel on May 5 to talk about big changes that need to be made for our environment.

Like the President of Indonesia, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono — who came to the event — said, to create sustainable environments we need to involve all the strata of our country, including the government and the youth, who represent a new generation.

In the first of a series of parallel discussion panels, a session titled “Climate change: Low-emissions development and societal welfare – trade offs, risks and power struggles in forest and climate change policy arenas”, hosted by Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Iman Santoso from Conservation International stated that the challenge of REDD+ planning and implementation comes from three things.

First, according to Santoso, the concept is wrongly classified as covering forest areas, while other areas that are suitable are not included. The second challenge relates to improving the quality of information and map scales, based on abundant data that comes from various images. Third, Santoso said, is that updated information and different scales have resulted in differing interpretations.

Participants appeared to be very interested by the discussion. Those attending were keen to share their knowledge, and asked many questions. Hopefully, they will be even more excited for the session entitled “Climate change: Lessons from ASEAN – REDD+ policy development and implementation”, which will offer a further detailed and critical look at the problem.

Nuri Nursjahbani is a student of the Faculty of Forestry at Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia.

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