CIFOR at 2016 IUFRO Regional Congress for Asia and Oceania

Forests for Sustainable Development: The Role of Research

24 - 27 October, Beijing, China.

Videos



The Honey Harvesters: Tradition and landscape management in West Timor

The Honey Harvesters: Tradition and landscape management in West Timor

For generations, honey has been collected by the community in the Mutis-Timau forest landscape in West Timor, Indonesia. Every year, community members travel great distances back to their sacred homeland when nature signals it is time to collect the honey. Combining traditional and religious beliefs, the people sing to the bees and pray for a bountiful and safe harvest. Research by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) has found the Mutis-Timau honey harvest to be a success story for sustainable community forestry. The tradition complements national policy on forest conservation, is environmentally sustainable, and provides income for local livelihoods. Learn more: http://blog.cifor.org/43871/a-living-traditi…th-sweet-rewards?fnl=en
Making Timber Plantations Attractive for Smallholders

Making Timber Plantations Attractive for Smallholders

Thousands of farmers across Indonesia could be earning more cash from trees they have always grown alongside their other crops. Yet this potential for a higher income is often unmet. A lack of information- about market values, timber growing techniques, and how cooperatives can improve sale price- persists. If farmers can take advantage of market opportunities in the saleyards, they could benefit from more secure income, for themselves and their families. Yet challenges need to be overcome- changes in government certification have increased the cost of legal sale, while knowledge gaps remain. This film explores the nuts and bolts of improving timber value and the programs that are helping farmers, and their trees, to flourish.
What the Paris Agreement means for Asia-Pacific forests

What the Paris Agreement means for Asia-Pacific forests

The Paris Agreement highlighted a strong role for forests in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions and finding new opportunities for REDD+. In this plenary session at the 2016 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit, panelists discuss how the region can work together to support Nationally Determined Contribution commitments made under the Paris Agreement. The role of government was a particular focus, including approaches for policy, governance and regulation to sustainably manage forests. Moderator: Patrick Durst, Senior Forestry Officer for Asia and the Pacific, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Presenter: Nur Masripatin, Director General of Climate Change Management, Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Indonesia Panel speakers: · Henning Hj. Johansen, Minister Counsellor - Deputy Representative to ASEAN, Norwegian Embassy Jakarta, Indonesia · Peter Holmgren, Director General, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) · Justin Lee, Deputy Head of Mission to Indonesia, Government of Australia Leaders in public, private and community sectors from across the Asia-Pacific gathered to discuss the future of the region’s forests at the Summit held from 3-5 August. Visit the event website: http://www.cifor.org/asia-pacific-rainforest-summit/
Beyond the blaze: What next for Indonesia’s forests?

Beyond the blaze: What next for Indonesia’s forests?

Tens of thousands of fires ravaged the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Kalimantan in September and October 2015, producing a noxious haze that affected tens of thousands of people. Seasonal rains began in November, but 2015/16 are El Nino years, so the threat of new fires is far from over. The problem is complex but it can be solved. Scientists from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) explain.
Top